Spitfire Marks

Information about the Spitfire Marks is by courtesy of The Spitfire Association, John Dell (UK), Phil Listemann (France), Peter Arnold (UK), Peter Lloyd (Aero Image Works), Rik Heslehurst and many other contributors. Compiled by Steve McGregor of the Spitfire Association, Sydney Australia.

Built to Air Ministry Spec F7/30, this was the first aircraft to carry the name Spitfire. A gull winged monoplane ...
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K5054 first flown in March 1936, using one of the very first Rolls Royce Merlin engines, the Spitfire prototype had ...
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The first production Spitfire, the mark I was powered by a Merlin III giving 1,030 hp and a maximum speed ...
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In an attempt to gain the world speed record two Mk I airframes on the production line were strengthened, one ...
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Produced at the Castle Bromwich "shadow" factory rather than at the Supermarine works at Southampton, production of the mark II ...
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Experimental prototype with 1,280 Merlin XX engine and a retractable tail-wheel, clipped wings, a redesigned front windscreen and a slightly ...
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Spitfire IA with armament removed, extra fuel tank and Camera fitted for photographic reconnaissance. All modified from existing IA machines ...
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Single prototype with the new Rolls Royce Griffon engine, later rebuilt as the Mk XX ...
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Another PR version, this time with the Merlin 45 engine in a IA airframe with armament removed, extra fuel, oil ...
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The most numerous mark of Spitfire, the V had the fuselage strengthened and Merlin 45, 46, 50, 55 or 56 ...
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At the time of the invasion of Norway work was started on converting Mk I Spitfires to use floats designed ...
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Developed to intercept high flying German reconnaissance aircraft, the Spitfire VI was developed for combat at extreme altitude. The cockpit ...
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Another high altitude fighter version. It was thought that the Germans would use high altitude bombers to strike at Britain, ...
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Another reconnaissance version. The P.R. VII used an IA airframe with a Merlin 45. Three cameras were fitted. Extra fuel ...
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The VIII was very much like the VII. It was a properly engineered airframe to mount the new Merlin engines ...
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Britain’s answer to the Focke-Wulf 190 the IX was a stop-gap project to put the new Merlin two-stage supercharged engine ...
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A high altitude photographic reconnaissance version with the pressurized cabin, retracting tail-wheel and pointed tail of the MKVII, a Merlin ...
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Another reconnaissance version the XI was very similar to the X except it did not have cabin pressurization. Merlin 61,63 ...
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The Spitfire XII was a dedicated low-level interceptor and introduced the Griffon engine with 1,735 hp. The Griffon made the ...
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A Photographic reconnaissance aircraft, the XIII was very similar to a Mark V except it had a Merlin 32 engine ...
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Just as the performance of the Merlin had been transformed by a two-stage supercharger, so the already impressive power of ...
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See Seafire Mk XVI ...
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Very much like the IX but with the American built Packard version of the Merlin known as the Merlin 266 ...
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A redesigned airframe to take the two stage Griffon was the main feature of this type. (The Mk XIV being ...
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A P.R. version of the Mk XIV with a teardrop hood, extra fuel in the wings. Many were fitted with ...
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The single Spitfire IV was renamed the XX when it was rebuilt with parts from the prototype XII ...
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With the 21 the classification of Spitfire marks swapped from Roman to Arabic numerals. The wing of the Spitfire had ...
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The 22 was the 21 but with a teardrop hood and cut back rear fuselage. Late Mk 22s had the ...
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Mark number assigned to a project to produce a Spitfire with a laminar flow wing. Such a wing was fitted ...
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The last production Spitfire the 24 had the big "Spiteful" tail as standard and was armed with four short barrelled ...
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Supermarine's replacement for the Spitfire was very similar in lines to the later Spitfires. It had an all-new wing with ...
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A naval conversion of the Spitfire V B. Eight machine-guns. The first 48 were intended to be used as trainers ...
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Another conversion of the Spitfire Mk V, this time the Spitfire VB with the universal wing able to take either ...
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Another aircraft broadly similar to the Mk V Spitfire, but with Merlin 55 engine driving a four bladed propeller and ...
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This had the single stage Griffon engine in a basically Seafire L Mk III airframe but with wing root fuel ...
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The XVII was very similar to the XV except that the engine was modified to give extra power for take-off ...
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The designation given to some XVIIs fitted with Griffon 36 engines ...
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All previous Seafires had single stage engines, fine for low altitude work and the defence of the fleet from all ...
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The same as the 45 except it now had the teardrop cockpit canopy. Some were fitted with the big "Spiteful" ...
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After the rush to get the 45 and 46 to the Fleet the 47 was the proper solution to the ...
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The Seafang was the Supermarine Spiteful in naval form. An order for 150 Seafangs was placed but only 10 production ...
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